The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade A Myth?

Slave table

Did the Transatlantic African Slave Trade really exist or is it another American myth? When taught about slavery in school, I often had questions the teacher couldn’t answer. I would ask, how did the slaves live stacked on top of one another at the bottom of the ship for months without drowning in their own feces and urine? Where are the ships and why aren’t any of them inside of a museum? How can Columbus be the founder of America when people were already here? When I attended college, I took a few African and African American history courses. During that time, I couldn’t help but ask the same questions. In my opinion, what was being taught about the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade didn’t make logical sense. I decided to take matters into my own hands and began my conquest for knowledge. The “new” information I began to come across was both eye and mind opening. One of the first books that was recommended to me was, They Came Before Columbus by Ivan Van Sertima. This book informed me of the impact Africans had in the Americas before Columbus.

They Came Before Columbus –along with other research– aided me in drawing the conclusion that the indigenous people to the Americas were black people and they were not brought here on ships. Instead, they were enslaved right here on their own lands. If they were brought on ships, the numbers are extremely exaggerated. It was published that 15,000,000 to 20,000,000 slaves arrived in the Americas between 1540 and 1850 over—a 310 year period (according to US History books). The Stewart Synopsis points out a few questions that should be examined:

1. Over a period of 300 years, is it fair to say that 60,000 slaves were transported annually to the Americas or has the transportation of slaves to the Americas been one big myth?

2. The largest seagoing vessel carried 400 slaves but not all of the ships were that large.

3. Time of passage was 3 – 4 months. That means 200 vessels/ships per year would have to travel carrying 300 people. One ship could make 3 passages per year. The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database says there were 1100 – 1400 voyages made over that 300 year period. If that is the case and each ship carried 400 people, the total number would be 560,000 Africans were transported. It still does not add up.

4. We already know that over 83% of all Americans with African ancestry have Native American blood.

5. Did Native American tribes help slaves escape or were Americans with African ancestry already part of the Native American Nations?

After 20 years the Royal Adventurer–with its 15 ships had transported between 90,000 and 100,000 slaves. That is a long ways from 15,000,000 to 20,000,000 slaves who were supposedly brought to the Americas. Doesn’t that leave a little over 14,000,000 to 19,000,000 people not accounted for—What’s up with that? Or is/was the Black/Brown birthrate that more accelerated than the White birthrate? The calculated median of 15 and 20 million would be 17.5 million. Divide it by 400 people—the largest slave vessels. That comes out to 43,750 trips. Can you show me a record where this many trips occurred, or the number of trips calculated by the so-called experts? (Figures exist of 27,000 – 35,000 voyages). The same thing happened with the holocaust in Germany during World War II. Six million people were supposedly killed, but there are not that many names referenced who died totaling six million.

Black people are indigenous to the Americas. Black Native Americans are not a result of the so called “red Indian” mixing with slaves. The so called “red Indian” comes from mixing with the European colonist.

Stewart Synopsis lists these black Native tribes:

The Washitaw of the Louisiana/Midwest
The Yamasee of the South East
The Iroquois
The Cherokee Indians
The Blackfoot Indians
The Pequot and Mohegans of Connecticut
The Black Californians (Calafians) (CAL in CALifornia literally means BLAK, after the name of the Great Mamma KALi / Queen KALifa)
The Olmecs of Mexico
The Darienite of Panama

Ask yourself, why is this information not taught in the classrooms and why are the Native Americans portrayed as “red” and not as black people when evidence shows otherwise?

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